exhibitions

Current Exhibitions

News Release
July 6, 2009
City of Chicago
City of Chicago
Richard M. Daley, Mayor
Department of Aviation
Department of Aviation
Rosemarie S. Andolino, Commissioner

Innovative Sculpture Brings New Perspective To O’Hare Travelers

CHICAGO – The City of Chicago is proud to host new artwork, an extended drawing of Anish Kapoor’s landmark sculpture Cloud Gate in Millennium Park. Created by identical twin artists Ryan and Trevor Oakes, the piece, entitled “Have No Narrow Perspective,” was originally installed in Millennium Park in May. It is now on display at O’Hare International Airport, in Terminal 2 just past security, north of the current Explore Chicago exhibit.

The Oakes twins have collaborated on various visual explorations since the age of three. Now in their 20’s, they have developed a remarkable new method for tracing the world before them onto a curved surface, completely freehand and by eye alone. This method has been described by Columbia University’s perceptual historian Jonathan Crary as one of the most original breakthroughs in the rendering of visual space since the Renaissance.

Last summer the Oakes twins utilized that concave drawing method on the Cloud Gate sculpture and produced an enlarged version, engraved onto a six-by-six foot metal armature, with the explanation of their technique inscribed in the base.

“We are pleased to host this sculpture as the latest addition to our art and exhibits program,” said Rosemarie S. Andolino. “Thanks to our collaborative work with the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, we can fulfill Mayor Daley’s vision to introduce Chicago's rich, diverse and expansive culture to visitors from around the world.”

The Chicago Airport System is self-supporting, using no local or state tax dollars for operations or capital improvements at O’Hare and Midway International airports. Together, Chicago’s airports generate more than $45 billion in annual economic activity and create 540,000 jobs for the region. Please visit www.flychicago.com to learn more about the Chicago Airport System.

The O’Hare Modernization Program, approved by the federal government in September 2005, will reconfigure O’Hare’s outdated intersecting runway configuration into a modern parallel configuration, substantially reducing delays and increasing capacity. The OMP will create up to 195,000 new jobs and add an additional $18 billion in annual economic activity to the region, on top of the 450,000 jobs and $38 billion O’Hare generates today, without the use of any state or local taxpayer dollars. For more information, please visit www.OhareModernization.org.

Have No Narrow Perspective by Ryan and Trevor Oakes
An extended drawing of Anish Kapoor’s landmark sculpture Cloud Gate in Millennium Park is on display at O’Hare International Airport, in Terminal 2 just past security, north of the current Explore Chicago exhibit. Created by identical twin artists Ryan and Trevor Oakes, the piece, entitled “Have No Narrow Perspective,” was originally installed in Millennium Park in May.
For Immediate Release

Official Vernissage of a new public sculpture

By Ryan and Trevor Oakes


In Millennium Park next to Anish Kapoor's Cloud Gate sculpture

Thursday May 14, 5 - 8pm

Have No Narrow Perspective by Ryan and Trevor Oakes

Having collaborated on various visual explorations since the age of three, identical twin artists Ryan and Trevor Oakes (now in their late twenties) have developed a remarkable new method for tracing the world before them onto a curved surface, completely freehand and by eye alone. This method has been described, by no less an authority than Columbia University's perceptual historian Jonathan Crary, as one of the most original breakthroughs in the rendering of visual space since the Renaissance. Last summer the Oakes Brothers were prominently seen deploying that method across an extended drawing of Anish Kapoor's landmark sculpture Cloud Gate. They subsequently took that concave drawing and produced an enlarged version, engraved onto a six-by-six foot metal armature, which they are currently displaying right there along side "the Bean" in Millennium Park.

On Thursday May 14th, from 5 - 8pm, Millennium Park, and the Department of Cultural Affairs in association with the Chicago Humanities Festival (which originally occasioned the Twin's presence in Chicago, along with the Spertus Institute), will host the Oakes Twins as they officially present their first public sculpture on site there by the Bean. They will be joined, among others, by Lawrence Weschler, the artistic director of the Chicago Humanities Festival, whose essay about the Twins and their method is featured in the current issue of the Virginia Quarterly Review

(see http://www.vqronline.org/articles/2009/spring/weschler-double-vision)

This sculpture is a sponsored project of the New York Foundation for the Arts

Double Vision

October 29 – December 14, 2008

Spertus Vestibule, Ground Floor

In conjunction with the Chicago Humanities Festival, Spertus hosted an exhibition by New York-based artists and identical twins Trevor and Ryan Oakes, who invented a method to render, by hand, an accurate camera-obscura style tracing of the world onto a curved surface. The exhibition included drawings, made this summer for this project, of Chicago points of interest. These included the award-winning new Spertus building, Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate (pictured right) and the Frank Gehry-designed Jay Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park, vistas of the Chicago River, historic Michigan Avenue architecture, and more.

Double Vision was displayed in Spertus’ ground floor vestibule during the Chicago Humanities Festival and was the exclusive showcase for not only the Chicago drawings but also a series of early sculptures about light and vision that lead up to the conception of this revolutionary idea.

Ryan and Trevor Oakes graduated from The Cooper Union School of Art in 2004. Their work is characterized by an in-depth investigation of light, vision, and the interplay between the visual cortex and the human retina.

Trevor Oakes drawing New York City on the inner surface of a sphere from the top of the Chrylser Building.

The Institute For Figuring

Announces a world premier event

At Machine Project


Seeing Anew

A lecture by Trevor and Ryan Oakes

Sunday, June 24 @ 7pm
Machine Project 1200 D North Alvarado
Los Angeles, CA 90026

It is hard to believe there is anything new to be discovered about perspective drawing. But in 2004 twin artists Trevor and Ryan Oakes made a startling discovery about how to render perspectival images on the inner surface on a sphere. Their discovery is all the more intriguing in the light of recent controversy surrounding David Hockney's thesis about the use of spherical lenses in the making of perspective drawings in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

In their first public talk the Oakes will discuss their perspectival researches and demonstrate their unique spherical rendering technique using a specially designed stand and an innovative concept of "concave paper". The lecture will include an historical account of other optical tools used to depict three-dimensional space - including the concave mirror-lens, the camera obscura, and the camera lucida. These prior techniques all involved optical equipment that in some sense controlled or bent the flow of light; the Oakes' method uses only pen and paper - but here it is the paper rather than the light that is bent.

Trevor and Ryan Oakes are visual artists in New York City. Their work is characterized by an in-depth investigation of light, vision, and the interplay between the visual cortex and the human retina . Ryan and Trevor graduated from The Cooper Union School of Art in 2004.